Northwest European
1993 Porsche RS America Teaser-1.jpg

1993 Porsche RS America

1993 Porsche RS America


HIGHLIGHTS

  • 33,000 Miles

  • Incredible Concours Condition Throughout

  • Options - LSD and A/C

  • Original Paint All Panels

SPECIFICATIONS

  • VIN - WP0AB2968PS419066

  • Engine – 3.6L, 6 cylinder

  • Gearbox – 5 speed manual

  • Drivetrain - Rear engine, RWD

  • Price - $130,000

OVERVIEW

The RS America was a special limited edition North American market car with only 701 examples being produced. While Europe received the Carrera RS along the same timeline, it was not a model that came to the United States due to federalization challenges. Through some lobbying from the Porsche Club of America, Porsche listened to the demands of the US market, and created a stripped down, lightened, and performance focused machine.

The RS America was based on the 964 C2 chassis, and then added M030 sport suspension (similar to C2 Turbo), 17” wheels, a fixed rear spoiler, RS lightweight door panels and release mechanism, and RS America badging.  From there, the factory deleted power steering, the rear seat, radio, some insulation, and A/C system (although you could add some of that back in with the options). It was a performance oriented “RS” model, and came in at a low price $10K less than a fully equipped C2 of the same model year.

Our car here (#303 of 701 produced) was sold new at Carrera Motors in Bend, Oregon on September 19, 1992, and it was dealer serviced for the next two years by the first owner. Per the entry in the maintenance book, the 2nd owner acquired it in March of 1994 at 3,397 miles and owned the car for  approximately 20 years and had the car serviced at Motor Sports International in Portland, Oregon (with stamps up to 30K miles) before selling to his close friend in Salem, Oregon. The car next traded at 32,949 miles in 2015 to a local dealer in Salem. The most recent owner acquired the car in 2016 from that same dealer and took the detailing level up a notch by removing the underbelly pans and cleaning the bottom of the car extensively.

Two options are present on this Guards Red RS America – Limited Slip Diff, and A/C. Originally a radio delete car, an aftermarket Alpine deck was added (all cars were prepped for radio from the factory with door speakers, windshield antenna, and amplifier – all you needed to do was add the deck), and is easy to remove as desired.

This car is in exceptional cosmetic condition. It is ready to roll onto the lawn at the next PCA concours event if you desired. The paint is original on all surfaces, and in mint condition for age and mileage showing very minimal flaws and true factory orange peel. The car wore a front-end bra on road trips to give you a sense of the careful ownership history. There is a minor scuffing on the lower black front spoiler from the errant driveway. Glass is all original, including the windshield. The engine bay is fastidiously tidy, as is the front trunk area when you remove the carpet – it looks factory fresh.

With only 33K miles, this RS America has no current mechanical needs and drives wonderfully. Recent oil change, belts, and full service have been completed. The car has accumulated less than 3,000 careful miles in the last 10 years. Tires are in excellent condition, however may be considered for replacement due to age (although they do not show any cracking or rot on visual inspection).

This RS America is offered for sale with all original books, window sticker, compressor, tools, and factory bra all present. In my opinion, one of the top 10% of RS America’s (or even any 964 chassis example) I have seen in person. Call today to add this to your collection, or compete to win at the next PCA Concours event.

Please contact Jason at 206-355-7727 for more information on this Porsche RS America for sale.


Gallery

 

 
This is a Porsche like Porsche used to build, like the die-hards used to buy and hold on to forever.
— Sports Car International, September 1992
... at the edge of your consciousness you are admiring the way the engine pulls in third gear only to drop your hand to the shift lever and find that you’ve been in fourth all along.
— Panorama, December 1992